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GNHUSA Contingent Part of 200,000 Strong D.C. Climate March

On April 30th, in strong sun and record setting heat (93 humid degrees), a hearty band of GNHUSA activists from Vermont and Pennsylvania joined the People’s Climate March in Washington, DC.

There we blended with an estimated 200,000 other marchers from across the country to stand up for environmental justice and a healthy sustainable future for all of us — and, future generations as well.  Common Dreams  coverage of the march: “From coast to coast and across continents, people marched for environmental justice on Saturday … Organizers said that an estimated 200,000 participated in the flagship Peoples Climate March in Washington, D.C., while tens of thousands more demonstrated at more than 350 solidarity events in cities across the United States as well as in Asia and Europe.”

Be sure to check out the video on the Common Dreams link. You won’t be able to spot us, but that’s part of the

Photo by Josh Hooper

excitement — just way too many people to identify anybody in the crowd. In fact, odds are good that we hadn’t even rounded the corner to be visible yet when this video was shot. The March organizers had designated seven different staging areas, starting with the indigenous people worldwide who are most at risk, or indeed, already suffering from climate change destruction right now.

GNHUSA was way back in group six, the “Reshapers of Power” — right between Ben and Jerry’s and the Sierra Club. That seemed appropriate. Reshaping the powerful grip that GDP currently has on our society, urging an untenable growth economy and an unsustainable consumerism — at a heavy, heavy cost to both our happiness and the well being of the planet — well, it’s a big job, and we’re going to need lots of walks in the woods, and plenty of ice cream to keep our energy up.

Photo by Josh Hooper.

Seriously — and this was a serious event, despite the overall good vibes of a committed crowd — it was important for GNHUSA to be present, based on our own “measuring what matters” system.  Using the metrics of the nine domains where governments have an important role to play in cultivating the conditions that support happiness, it was quite clear that walking our talk in this case meant steps on a hot pavement for the climate march (read more about that decision making process here).

Those of us who went were grateful for the opportunity. Here are just a few more pictures of our experience there.

Photo by Josh Hooper

Photo by Josh Hooper

Photo by Josh Hooper

Photo by Josh Hooper

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